Hear From Other BUGSS Kids
& Check Out Fun Activites Just For You!

And parents, check out our brochure on how to get invloved

Our Educational Brochure

For Younger Kids

Agar Art

1 hour class

Use colored bacteria and yeast to create your own living art works by drawing with colored organisms on petri dishes.

For Big Kids

The ACTG’s of Fruit!

1.5 hour course

What is DNA? What is a gene? We’ll learn by using chemistry to extract DNA from several fruits. Can you guess the number of chromosomes in each based on the amount of DNA?

For Older Kids

iTune Device

4 hour course

This lab focuses on predictable design. Students will examine the role of parts, such as promoters and ribosome binding sites, in determining the output of a genetic device. The students measure β-galactosidase enzymatic activity as the device’s output, enabling them to look through the lens of molecular genetics to evaluate a device’s behavior.

“BUGSS provides creative learning experiences, responsive to the interests of our community members.”

Neiyer Correal-Winters and his two sons Naige and Patrick read about groundbreaking CRISPR technology that allows rapid and efficient genome editing. Eager to try their hands with the technology, they obtained a family membership to BUGSS, ordered materials online, and developed their own CRISPR project under the guidance of lab staff and mentors. At the BUGSS lab, they are able to pursue this unique family activity!

“BUGSS motivates students with socially relevant science.”

Ella Coleman is a home schooled student who joined the BUGSS team for the International Genetically Engineered Machines competition (iGEM). The six high school students conceived of a project, engineering bacterial cells to degrade plastic and help clean up pollution in the Inner Harbor. Ella traveled to Boston with the team, delivered oral and poster presentations at the International Jamboree of high school and college students, talked about her work with faculty judges, and won a team bronze medal. The team’s incredible work was recognized with an article and video of Ella on the front page of the Baltimore Sun!

“BUGSS inspires science and technology careers.”

Rachael Avidor, Julius Gingles, and Mercedes Thompson are three students from Baltimore city high schools who participated in BUGSS’ 2016 iGEM team. While these three students had long been interested in science, the iGEM experience was unique in allowing them to take leadership and ownership of a scientific project. Each is continuing to excel on their scientific path, engaging in additional research at Johns Hopkins and the NIH, winning full scholarships to Brown and Johns Hopkins Universities, and founding Baltimore Beyond Plastic. These students will lead the scientific revolution of the next generation!